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Bruton Agammaglobulinemia tyrosine Kinase (BTK) (N-Term) antibody

Details for Product No. ABIN1001944, Supplier: Log in to see
Antigen
  • BTK
  • atk
  • bpk
  • xla
  • imd1
  • agmx1
  • psctk1
  • AGMX1
  • AT
  • ATK
  • BPK
  • IMD1
  • PSCTK1
  • XLA
  • AI528679
  • xid
Alternatives
anti-Human Bruton Agammaglobulinemia tyrosine Kinase antibody for Immunoprecipitation
Epitope
N-Term
31
29
15
15
15
13
12
6
5
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Reactivity
Human, Mouse (Murine)
240
92
79
14
6
4
2
1
Host
Rabbit
171
69
Clonality
Polyclonal
Conjugate
Un-conjugated
10
8
7
5
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Application
Immunocytochemistry (ICC), ELISA, Western Blotting (WB)
181
90
77
57
42
35
25
14
10
5
2
2
2
2
Supplier
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Immunogen Rabbit polyclol BTK antibody was raised against a synthetic peptide corresponding to 16 amino acids near the amino-terminus of human BTK (Genbank accession No. Q06187).
Blocking Peptide Blocking peptide for this product available: ABIN1004102
Isotype IgG
Purification Affinity chromatography purified via peptide column.
Alternative Name Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase (BTK Antibody Abstract)
Background Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) was initially identified as a member of the src family for protein-tyrosine kinases that was involved in X-linked agamma-globulinaemia, and has since been shown to involved in a number of signaling pathways in hemapoietic lineage. It has recently been shown to interact with members of the toll-like receptor (TLR) family such as TLR4, 6, 8, and 9. The TLRs are critical molecules in both the innate and adaptive immunity and can recognize diverse microbial pathogens. BTK has also been shown to interact with key proteins involved in TLR4 signal transduction such as MyD88, TIRAP, and IRAK, but not TRAF-6, suggesting that BTK is involved in lipopolysaccharide signal transduction.
Pathways Fc-epsilon Receptor Signaling Pathway
Application Notes BTK antibody can be used for the detection of BTK by Western blot at 0.5 to 1 µg/ml. (Optimal dilution should be determined by user.) Antibody can also be used for immunocytochemistry and ELISA and might be suited for other applications not tested so far.
Restrictions For Research Use only
Format Liquid
Buffer Antibody is supplied in PBS containing 0.02% sodium azide.
Preservative Sodium azide
Precaution of Use This product contains sodium azide: a POISONOUS AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE which should be handled by trained staff only.
Handling Advice Antibody can be stored at 4 °C, stable for one year. As with all antibodies care should be taken to avoid repeated freeze thaw cycles. Antibodies should not be exposed to prolonged high temperatures. During shipment, small volumes of antibody will occasionally become entrapped in the seal of the product vial. For products with volumes of 200 myl or less, we recommend gently tapping the vial on a hard surface or briefly centrifuging the vial in a tabletop centrifuge to dislodge any liquid in the container’s cap.
Storage 4 °C
Expiry Date 12 months
Product cited in: Akira, Takeda: "Toll-like receptor signalling." in: Nature reviews. Immunology, Vol. 4, Issue 7, pp. 499-511, 2004 (PubMed).

Jefferies, Doyle, Brunner et al.: "Bruton's tyrosine kinase is a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain-binding protein that participates in nuclear factor kappaB activation by Toll-like receptor 4." in: The Journal of biological chemistry, Vol. 278, Issue 28, pp. 26258-64, 2003 (PubMed).

Kawakami, Kitaura, Hata et al.: "Functions of Bruton's tyrosine kinase in mast and B cells." in: Journal of leukocyte biology, Vol. 65, Issue 3, pp. 286-90, 1999 (PubMed).

Vetrie, Vorechovský, Sideras et al.: "The gene involved in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia is a member of the src family of protein-tyrosine kinases." in: Nature, Vol. 361, Issue 6409, pp. 226-33, 1993 (PubMed).