You are viewing an incomplete version of our website. Please click to reload the website as full version.

Neuraminidase, NEU (NEU) (C-Term) antibody

Details for Product No. ABIN1002324, Supplier: Log in to see
Antigen
Epitope
C-Term
12
9
8
4
4
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
Reactivity
Influenza A Virus H5N1
23
22
14
8
6
6
4
3
3
2
2
2
1
1
Host
Rabbit
77
20
Clonality
Polyclonal
Conjugate
Un-conjugated
11
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Application
ELISA
64
41
12
10
10
6
5
4
4
4
4
4
3
2
Supplier
Log in to see
Supplier Product No.
Log in to see
Request

Showcase your results, aid the scientific community, and receive a full refund.

Contribute a validation

Learn more

Immunogen Rabbit polyclol Neuraminidase antibody was raised against a synthetic peptide corresponding to 15 amino acids at the carboxy terminus of the Neuraminidase protein (Genbank accession no. CAC95053). Efforts were made to use relatively conserved regions as the antigen.
Blocking Peptide Blocking peptide for this product available: ABIN1003829
Isotype IgG
Purification Affinity chromatography purified via peptide column.
Alternative Name Neuraminidase (NEU Antibody Abstract)
Background Influenza A virus is a major public health threat, killing more than 30,000 people per year in the USA. Novel influenza virus strains emerge periodically to which humans have little or no immunity, resulting in devastating pandemics. Influenza A can exist in a variety of animals, however it is in birds that all subtypes can be found. These subtypes are classified based on the combination of the virus coat glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) subtypes. During 1997, an H5N1 avian influenza virus was determined to be the cause of death in 6 of 18 infected patients in Hong Kong. There was some evidence of human to human spread of this virus, but it is thought that the transmission efficiency was fairly low. Although it has been known that cleavage site and glycosylation patterns of the HA protein play important roles in determining the pathogenicity of H5 avian influenza viruses, it has only recently been shown that an additional glycosylation site within the globular head of the NA protein also contributes to the high virulence of the H5N1 virus.
Pathways
Application Notes Avian influenza neuriminidase antibody can be used for the detection of the avian influenza neuriminidase protein from the H5N1 strain of Avian influenza A in ELISA. It will detect 10 ng of free peptide at 1 µg/ml. (Optimal dilution should be determined by user.) Other applications are pending.
Restrictions For Research Use only
Format Liquid
Buffer Antibody is supplied in PBS containing 0.02% sodium azide.
Preservative Sodium azide
Precaution of Use This product contains sodium azide: a POISONOUS AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE which should be handled by trained staff only.
Handling Advice Antibody can be stored at 4 °C, stable for one year. As with all antibodies care should be taken to avoid repeated freeze thaw cycles. Antibodies should not be exposed to prolonged high temperatures. During shipment, small volumes of antibody will occasionally become entrapped in the seal of the product vial. For products with volumes of 200 myl or less, we recommend gently tapping the vial on a hard surface or briefly centrifuging the vial in a tabletop centrifuge to dislodge any liquid in the container’s cap.
Storage 4 °C
Expiry Date 12 months
Product cited in: Alexander: "A review of avian influenza in different bird species." in: Veterinary microbiology, Vol. 74, Issue 1-2, pp. 3-13, 2000 (PubMed).

Background publications Thompson, Shay, Weintraub et al.: "Mortality associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in the United States." in: JAMA, Vol. 289, Issue 2, pp. 179-86, 2003 (PubMed).

Shortridge, Zhou, Guan et al.: "Characterization of avian H5N1 influenza viruses from poultry in Hong Kong." in: Virology, Vol. 252, Issue 2, pp. 331-42, 1999 (PubMed).