LFA-Beta2 (ITGB2) antibody

Details for Product No. ABIN649991
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Antigen
Reactivity
Human
(1), (1)
Host
Rabbit
(1)
Clonality
Monoclonal
Application
Western Blotting (WB)
(1), (1)
Pubmed 1 reference available
Quantity 100 μL
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Catalog No. ABIN649991
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Specificity A synthetic peptide corresponding to residues near the N-terminus of human LFA-β,2 was used as an immunogen.
Background In the immune system, integrins have essential roles in leukocyte trafficking and function. These include immune cell attachment to endothelial and antigen-presenting cells, cytotoxicity, and extravasation into tissues (1). Integrin adhesion receptors transduce signals that control complex cell functions which require the regulation of gene expression, such as proliferation, differentiation and survival. Their intracellular domain has no catalytic function, indicating that interaction with other transducing molecules is crucial for integrin-mediated signaling. JAB1 (Jun activation domain-binding protein 1), a coactivator of the c-Jun transcription factor, has been identified as a protein that interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of the beta2 subunit of the alphaL/beta2 integrin LFA-1 (2). Patients with leukocyte adhesion molecule (CD11/CD18, beta 2 integrins) deficiency have structural defects in the common beta subunit (CD18), which prevent heterodimer formation and normal cell surface expression of these receptors, leading to life-threatening bacterial infections (3)
Synonyms: ITGB2, CD18, MFI7, Integrin beta-2, Cell surface adhesion glycoproteins LFA-1/CR3/p150,95 subunit beta,Complement receptor C3 subunit beta
Molecular Weight 95 kDA
Gene ID 3689
UniProt P05107
Research Area Phospho-specific antibodies, Cell Signaling, Protein Modifications, Cell Structure
Application Notes The suggested dilution is: WB: = 1:2000
Comment

Background: In the immune system, integrins have essential roles in leukocyte trafficking and function. These include immune cell attachment to endothelial and antigen-presenting cells, cytotoxicity, and extravasation into tissues (1). Integrin adhesion receptors transduce signals that control complex cell functions which require the regulation of gene expression, such as proliferation, differentiation and survival. Their intracellular domain has no catalytic function, indicating that interaction with other transducing molecules is crucial for integrin-mediated signaling. JAB1 (Jun activation domain-binding protein 1), a coactivator of the c-Jun transcription factor, has been identified as a protein that interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of the beta2 subunit of the alphaL/beta2 integrin LFA-1 (2). Patients with leukocyte adhesion molecule (CD11/CD18, beta 2 integrins) deficiency have structural defects in the common beta subunit (CD18), which prevent heterodimer formation and normal cell surface expression of these receptors, leading to life-threatening bacterial infections (3)

Restrictions For Research Use only
Format Liquid
Buffer 50 mM Tris-Glycine (pH 7.4), 0.15 M NaCl, 40% Glycerol, 0.01% sodium azide and 0.05% BSA.
Preservative Sodium azide
Precaution of Use This product contains sodium azide: a POISONOUS AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE which should be handled by trained staff only.
Storage -20 °C
Storage Comment LFA-beta2 (ITGB2) Antibody can be stored at -20°C for up to 12 months from time of receipt.
Expiry Date 12 months
Background publications Nelson, Rabb, Arnaout: "Genetic cause of leukocyte adhesion molecule deficiency. Abnormal splicing and a missense mutation in a conserved region of CD18 impair cell surface expression of beta 2 integrins." in: The Journal of biological chemistry, Vol. 267, Issue 5, pp. 3351-7, 1992 (PubMed).

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