Crystallin, gamma B (CRYGB) (AA 67-97), (Middle Region) antibody

Details for Product No. ABIN952455
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Antigen
Synonyms MGC64303, cryg2, MGC85383, MGC146522, CRYG2, CTRCT39, Cryg-3, DGcry-3, Nop, Cryg2, Len
Epitope
AA 67-97, Middle Region
(7)
Reactivity
Human
(8)
Host
Rabbit
(7), (1)
Clonality
Polyclonal
Conjugate
Un-conjugated
(1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1)
Application
ELISA, Western Blotting (WB)
(8), (6), (1)
Pubmed 5 references available
Quantity 0.4 mL
Shipping to United States (Change)
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Catalog No. ABIN952455
357.50 $
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Immunogen KLH conjugated synthetic peptide between 67-97 amino acids from the Central region of Human CRYGB. Genename: CRYGB
Specificity This antibody recognizes Human Gamma-crystallin B (Center).
Purification Affinity Chromatography on Protein A
Alternative Name Gamma-crystallin B
Background Crystallins are separated into two classes: taxon-specific, or enzyme, and ubiquitous. The latter class constitutes the major proteins of vertebrate eye lens and maintains the transparency and refractive index of the lens. Since lens central fiber cells lose their nuclei during development, these crystallins are made and then retained throughout life, making them extremely stable proteins. Mammalian lens crystallins are divided into alpha, beta, and gamma families, beta and gamma crystallins are also considered as a superfamily. Alpha and beta families are further divided into acidic and basic groups. Seven protein regions exist in crystallins: four homologous motifs, a connecting peptide, and N- and C- terminal extensions. Gamma-crystallins are a homogeneous group of highly symmetrical, monomeric proteins typically lacking connecting peptides and terminal extensions. They are differentially regulated after early development. Four gamma-crystallin genes (gamma- A through gamma-D) and three pseudogenes (gamma-E, gamma-F, gamma-G) are tandemly organized in a genomic segment as a gene cluster. Whether due to aging or mutations in specific genes, gamma-crystallins have been involved in cataract formation.
Alternate names: CRYG2, CRYGB, Gamma-B-crystallin, Gamma-crystallin 1-2
Gene ID 1419
NCBI Accession NP_005201
Restrictions For Research Use only
Format Liquid
Concentration 0.25 mg/mL
Buffer PBS 0.09% Sodium Azide
Preservative Sodium azide
Precaution of Use This product contains sodium azide: a POISONOUS AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE which should be handled by trained staff only.
Handling Advice Avoid repeated freezing and thawing.
Storage 4 °C/-20 °C
Storage Comment Store undiluted at 2-8°C for one month or (in aliquots) at -20°C for longer.
Expiry Date 12 months
Background publications Salim, Bano, Zaidi: "Prediction of possible sites for posttranslational modifications in human gamma crystallins: effect of glycation on the structure of human gamma-B-crystallin as analyzed by molecular modeling." in: Proteins, Vol. 53, Issue 2, pp. 162-73, 2003 (PubMed).

Hillier, Graves, Fulton et al.: "Generation and annotation of the DNA sequences of human chromosomes 2 and 4. ..." in: Nature, Vol. 434, Issue 7034, pp. 724-31, 2005 (PubMed).

Choy, Wang, Ogura et al.: "Genomic annotation of 15,809 ESTs identified from pooled early gestation human eyes." in: Physiological genomics, Vol. 25, Issue 1, pp. 9-15, 2006 (PubMed).

Kapur, Mehra, Gajjar et al.: "Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms of CRYGA and CRYGB genes in control population of western Indian origin." in: Indian journal of ophthalmology, Vol. 57, Issue 3, pp. 197-201, 2009 (PubMed).

Acosta-Sampson, King: "Partially folded aggregation intermediates of human gammaD-, gammaC-, and gammaS-crystallin are recognized and bound by human alphaB-crystallin chaperone." in: Journal of molecular biology, Vol. 401, Issue 1, pp. 134-52, 2010 (PubMed).

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