Prolactin (PRL) (AA 29-227), (N-Term) (Active) Protein

Details for Product No. ABIN2666567, Supplier: Log in to see
Protein Name
  • PRL
  • prolactin
  • PRLB
  • PRLSD1
  • Prl1a1
  • Prol
  • RATPRLSD1
  • RNPROL
  • AV290867
  • prl
  • prolactin
  • prolactin, gene 3
  • PROLACTIN protein
  • prolactin-like
  • PRL
  • prl.3
  • Prl
  • LOC100136792
  • LOC100136580
  • PROLACTIN
  • LOC101843376
Protein Characteristics
AA 29-227, N-Term
13
11
6
4
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Origin
Human
40
18
16
11
6
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Source
Escherichia coli (E. coli)
64
32
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
Protein Type
Recombinant
Biological Activity
Active
Application
Flow Cytometry (FACS)
Options
Supplier
Log in to see
Supplier Product No.
Log in to see
Purity > 95 % , as determined by Coomassie stained SDS-PAGE.
Sterility 0.22 μm filtered
Endotoxin Level

Less than 0.1 EU per μg of protein as determined by the LAL method.

Background Prolactin, also known as luteotropin, is a hormone that is secreted by the pituitary gland and is best known for its role in enabling female mammals to produce milk. However, prolactin has also been shown to play essential roles in the regulation of immune functions, pancreatic development, angiogenesis, reproduction, osmoregulation, and metabolism. Besides the pituitary origin, prolactin is found in other tissues and cells such as adipocytes, immune cells, skin, prostate, brain, and decidua. This hormone is produced in increasing amounts during pregnancy and suckling. It acts on the mammary gland by initiating and maintaining lactation in the postpartum period. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that circulating high levels of prolactin increase the risk of breast cancer. Prolactin may promote mammary tumor initiation via the JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway. Human prolactin has a 60 % amino acid sequence homology with its murine counterpart. In a knockout animal study, it was shown that female mice lacking the expression of prolactin were infertile, but does not prevent them from manifesting spontaneous maternal behaviors. In addition, these animals show no sign of alterations in myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis, suggesting that prolactin may not play an indispensable role in lymphocyte development and myeloid differentiation.
Molecular Weight The 200 amino acid recombinant protein has a predicted molecular mass of approximately 23 kDa. The protein migrates approximately at 25 kDa in DTT-reducing conditions by SDS-PAGE. The predicted N-terminal amino acid is Met.
Research Area Signaling, Hormones
Pathways JAK-STAT Signaling, Peptide Hormone Metabolism, Response to Growth Hormone Stimulus, Protein targeting to Nucleus
Application Notes Optimal working dilution should be determined by the investigator.
Comment

Biological activity: Human Prolactin induces proliferation of MCF7 breast cancer cells in a dose dependent manner. The ED50 is 60 - 350 ng/mL.

Restrictions For Research Use only
Format Liquid
Reconstitution For maximum results, quick spin vial prior to opening. The protein can be aliquoted and stored at -20 °C to -70 °C. Stock solutions can also be prepared at 50 - 100 μg/mL in sterile buffer (PBS, HPBS, DPBS, or EBSS) containing carrier protein such as 0.2 - 1 % BSA or HSA and stored in working aliquots at -20 °C to -70 °C.
Buffer 0.22 μm filtered protein solution is in PBS.
Handling Advice Avoid repeated freeze/thaw cycles.
Storage -20 °C
Storage Comment Unopened vial can be stored between 2°C and 8°C for one month, at -20°C for six months, or at -70°C for one year.
Supplier Images
ELISA image for Prolactin (PRL) (AA 29-227), (N-Term) (Active) protein (ABIN2666567) Prolactin (PRL) (AA 29-227), (N-Term) (Active) protein
Background publications Correale, Farez, Ysrraelit: "Role of prolactin in B cell regulation in multiple sclerosis." in: Journal of neuroimmunology, Vol. 269, Issue 1-2, pp. 76-86, 2014 (PubMed).

Kennett, McKee: "Oxytocin: an emerging regulator of prolactin secretion in the female rat." in: Journal of neuroendocrinology, Vol. 24, Issue 3, pp. 403-12, 2012 (PubMed).

Bernichtein, Touraine, Goffin: "New concepts in prolactin biology." in: The Journal of endocrinology, Vol. 206, Issue 1, pp. 1-11, 2010 (PubMed).

Ben-Jonathan, LaPensee, LaPensee: "What can we learn from rodents about prolactin in humans?" in: Endocrine reviews, Vol. 29, Issue 1, pp. 1-41, 2008 (PubMed).

Acosta, Muñoz, González, Subtil-Rodríguez, Dominguez-Caceres, García-Martínez, Calcabrini, Lazaro-Trueba, Martín-Pérez: "Src mediates prolactin-dependent proliferation of T47D and MCF7 cells via the activation of focal adhesion kinase/Erk1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways." in: Molecular endocrinology (Baltimore, Md.), Vol. 17, Issue 11, pp. 2268-82, 2003 (PubMed).

Horseman, Zhao, Montecino-Rodriguez, Tanaka, Nakashima, Engle, Smith, Markoff, Dorshkind: "Defective mammopoiesis, but normal hematopoiesis, in mice with a targeted disruption of the prolactin gene." in: The EMBO journal, Vol. 16, Issue 23, pp. 6926-35, 1998 (PubMed).

Ben-Jonathan, Mershon, Allen, Steinmetz: "Extrapituitary prolactin: distribution, regulation, functions, and clinical aspects." in: Endocrine reviews, Vol. 17, Issue 6, pp. 639-69, 1997 (PubMed).

Did you look for something else?