Phone:
+1 877 302 8632
Fax:
+1 888 205 9894 (Toll-free)
E-Mail:
orders@antibodies-online.com

Lactate Colorimetric Assay Kit II Kit

BCA Reactivity: Chemical Colorimetric Cell Culture Supernatant, Plasma, Serum, Tissue Samples
Pubmed (21)
Catalog No. ABIN411683
$515.00
Plus shipping costs $45.00
100 tests
local_shipping Shipping to: United States
Delivery in 2 to 3 Business Days
  • Target
    Lactate
    Reactivity
    • 2
    • 2
    • 1
    • 1
    Chemical
    Detection Method
    Colorimetric
    Detection Range
    0.02-10 mM
    Minimum Detection Limit
    0.02 mM
    Application
    Biochemical Assay (BCA)
    Sample Type
    Cell Culture Supernatant, Plasma, Serum, Tissue Samples
    Specificity
    In the Lactate Assay Kit, lactate is oxidized by lactate dehydrogenase to generate a product which interacts with a probe to produce a color (lambda max = 450 nm). The kit detect L(+)-Lactate in biological samples such as in serum or plasma, cells, culture and fermentation media. There is no need for pretreatment or purification of samples. It detects 0.02 mM - 10 mM lactate in various samples.
    Characteristics
    Lactate Assay Kit II: Colorimetric Assay to Measure L(+)-Lactate in a variety of Biological Samples such as Serum, Plasma, Cells, Culture & Fermentation mediums, etc. within 40 min. Rapid, Simple & Sensitive.
    Components
    Lactate Assay Buffer
    Lactate Enzyme Mix
    Lactate Substrate Mix
    L(+)-Lactate Standard (100 mM)
  • Application Notes
    Kit detects 0.02 mM - 10 mM lactate in various samples.
    Comment

    Further details regarding sample type: Cell and tissue culture supernatants, urine, plasma and serum, as well as many other biological fluids, monitoring level during fermentation and feeding in protein expression processes

    Assay Time
    < 1 h
    Protocol
    1. Standard Curve Preparations : Dilute the Lactate Standard (MW 90.08) to 1 mM by adding 10 µL of the Lactate Standard to 990 µL of Lactate Assay Buffer, mix well. Add 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 µL into each well individually. Adjust volume to 50 µL/well with Lactate Assay Buffer to generate 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 nM/well of the L(+)-Lactate Standard.
    2. Sample Preparation: Prepare test samples at 50 µL/well with Lactate Assay Buffer in a 96-well plate. For serum samples, 0.5-10 µL serum can be directly tested (regular serum contains approx. 0.6 nM/µL lactate). We suggest using several doses of your sample to ensure the readings are within the standard curve range. Note: (1) Tissue or cells can be homogenized in the assay buffer. Centrifuge to remove the insoluble materials. The soluble fraction may be assayed directly. (2) NADH or NADPH from cell or tissue extracts generates background for the lactate assay. To remove the NADH or NADPH background, same amount of sample can be tested in the absence of Lactate Enzyme Mix. Then the background readings can be subtracted from the lactate reading. (3) Endogenous Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) may degrade lactate. Samples containing LDH (such as culture medium or tissue lysate) should be kept at -80 °C for storage, or filtered through a 10kd mw spin filter to remove all proteins.
    3. Reaction Mix Preparation: Mix sufficient reagent for the number of assays performed. For each well, prepare a total 50 µL Reaction Mix containing the following components. Mix well before use: 46 µL Lactate Assay Buffer 2 µL Lactate Substrate Mix 2 µL Lactate Enzyme Mix
    4. Add 50 µL of the Reaction Mix to each well containing the Lactate Standard or test samples, mix well.
    5. Incubate the reaction for 30 minutes at room temperature.
    6. Measure O.D. 450nm in a microplate reader. The color is stable for at least 4 hours.
    Calculation of Results

    Calculation: Correct background by subtracting the value derived from the 0 lactate control from all standard and sample readings

    Restrictions
    For Research Use only
  • Storage
    -20 °C
    Expiry Date
    12 months
  • Apostolova, Funes, Blas-Garcia, Alegre, Polo, Esplugues: "Involvement of nitric oxide in the mitochondrial action of efavirenz: a differential effect on neurons and glial cells." in: The Journal of infectious diseases, Vol. 211, Issue 12, pp. 1953-8, 2015 (PubMed).

    Duivenvoorde, van Schothorst, Swarts, Keijer: "Assessment of metabolic flexibility of old and adult mice using three noninvasive, indirect calorimetry-based treatments." in: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, Vol. 70, Issue 3, pp. 282-93, 2015 (PubMed).

    Kanda, Noda, Ishida: "ATP6AP2/(pro)renin receptor contributes to glucose metabolism via stabilizing the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 β subunit." in: The Journal of biological chemistry, Vol. 290, Issue 15, pp. 9690-700, 2015 (PubMed).

    Lee, Oney, Frizzell, Phadnis, Hollien: "Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 4 regulates glycolysis during endoplasmic reticulum stress." in: G3 (Bethesda, Md.), Vol. 5, Issue 4, pp. 667-75, 2015 (PubMed).

    Gravel, Hulea, Toban, Birman, Blouin, Zakikhani, Zhao, Topisirovic, St-Pierre, Pollak: "Serine Deprivation Enhances Anti-neoplastic Activity of Biguanides." in: Cancer research, 2014 (PubMed).

    Liu, Haines, Mehanna, Genet, Ben-Sahra, Asara, Manning, Yuan: "ZBTB7A acts as a tumor suppressor through the transcriptional repression of glycolysis." in: Genes & development, Vol. 28, Issue 17, pp. 1917-28, 2014 (PubMed).

    Makinoshima, Takita, Matsumoto, Yagishita, Owada, Esumi, Tsuchihara: "Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling regulates global metabolic pathways in EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma." in: The Journal of biological chemistry, Vol. 289, Issue 30, pp. 20813-23, 2014 (PubMed).

    Cheng, Quintin, Cramer, Shepardson, Saeed, Kumar, Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Martens, Rao, Aghajanirefah, Manjeri, Li, Ifrim, Arts, van der Veer, van der Meer, Deen, Logie, ONeill, Willems et al.: "mTOR- and HIF-1α-mediated aerobic glycolysis as metabolic basis for trained immunity. ..." in: Science (New York, N.Y.), Vol. 345, Issue 6204, pp. 1250684, 2014 (PubMed).

    Park, Mukherjee, Ito, Chaumeil, Jalbert, Gaensler, Ronen, Nelson, Pieper: "Changes in pyruvate metabolism detected by magnetic resonance imaging are linked to DNA damage and serve as a sensor of temozolomide response in glioblastoma cells." in: Cancer research, Vol. 74, Issue 23, pp. 7115-24, 2014 (PubMed).

    Garufi, Ricci, Trisciuoglio, Iorio, Carpinelli, Pistritto, Cirone, D Orazi: "Glucose restriction induces cell death in parental but not in homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2-depleted RKO colon cancer cells: molecular mechanisms and implications for tumor therapy." in: Cell death & disease, Vol. 4, pp. e639, 2013 (PubMed).

    Tang, Duan, Bleher, Goldberg: "Human lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) rescues mouse Ldhc-null sperm function." in: Biology of reproduction, Vol. 88, Issue 4, pp. 96, 2013 (PubMed).

    Ishida, Andreux, Poitry-Yamate, Auwerx, Hanahan: "Bioavailable copper modulates oxidative phosphorylation and growth of tumors." in: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 110, Issue 48, pp. 19507-12, 2013 (PubMed).

    Cahova, Palenickova, Papackova, Dankova, Skop, Kazdova: "Epinephrine-dependent control of glucose metabolism in white adipose tissue: the role of α- and β-adrenergic signalling." in: Experimental biology and medicine (Maywood, N.J.), Vol. 237, Issue 2, pp. 211-8, 2012 (PubMed).

    Wang, Chatterjee, Jeon, Akerman, Vander Heiden, Cantley, Krainer: "Exon-centric regulation of pyruvate kinase M alternative splicing via mutually exclusive exons." in: Journal of molecular cell biology, Vol. 4, Issue 2, pp. 79-87, 2012 (PubMed).

    Contractor, Harris: "p53 negatively regulates transcription of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase Pdk2." in: Cancer research, Vol. 72, Issue 2, pp. 560-7, 2012 (PubMed).

    Gustafson, Lin, New, Bulur, ONeill, Gastineau, Dietz: "Systemic immune suppression in glioblastoma: the interplay between CD14+HLA-DRlo/neg monocytes, tumor factors, and dexamethasone." in: Neuro-oncology, Vol. 12, Issue 7, pp. 631-44, 2011 (PubMed).

    Wei, Wei, Gan, Peng, Zou, Guan: "Suppression of autophagy by FIP200 deletion inhibits mammary tumorigenesis." in: Genes & development, Vol. 25, Issue 14, pp. 1510-27, 2011 (PubMed).

    Kuroda, Yamazaki, Abe, Sakimura, Takayanagi, Iwai: "Basic leucine zipper transcription factor, ATF-like (BATF) regulates epigenetically and energetically effector CD8 T-cell differentiation via Sirt1 expression." in: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 108, Issue 36, pp. 14885-9, 2011 (PubMed).

    Barba, Garcia-Ramírez, Hernández, Alonso, Masmiquel, García-Dorado, Simó: "Metabolic fingerprints of proliferative diabetic retinopathy: an 1H-NMR-based metabonomic approach using vitreous humor." in: Investigative ophthalmology & visual science, Vol. 51, Issue 9, pp. 4416-21, 2010 (PubMed).

    Bass, Engle, Belk, Chapman, Archibeque, Smith, Tatum: "Effects of sex and short-term magnesium supplementation on stress responses and longissimus muscle quality characteristics of crossbred cattle." in: Journal of animal science, Vol. 88, Issue 1, pp. 349-60, 2009 (PubMed).

  • Target
    Lactate
    Target Type
    Chemical
    Background
    Lactate (CH₃CH(OH)COO-) plays important roles in many biological processes. Abnormally high concentrations of lactate have been related to disease states such as diabetes and lactic acidosis, etc. L(+)-Lactate is the major lactate stereoisomer formed in human intermediary metabolism and is present in blood. D(-)-Lactate is also present but only at about 1-5 % of the concentration of L(+)-Lactate. In the Lactate Assay Kit, lactate is oxidized by lactate dehydrogenase to generate a product which interacts with a probe to produce a color (λmax = 450 nm). The kit detect L(+)-Lactate in biological samples such as in serum or plasma, cells, culture and fermentation media. There is no need for pretreatment or purification of samples. It detects 0.02 mM - 10 mM lactate in various samples.
You are here:
help Support