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Resistin antibody (RETN)

Details for Product anti-RETN Antibody No. ABIN115514, Supplier: Log in to see
Antigen
  • RETN
  • ADSF
  • FIZZ3
  • RETN1
  • RSTN
  • XCP1
  • Fizz3
  • Rstn
  • Xcp4
Reactivity
Human
197
96
52
14
2
1
Host
Rabbit
208
56
50
8
6
4
Clonality
Polyclonal
Conjugate
This Resistin antibody is un-conjugated
45
13
9
4
4
4
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
Application
Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA), Western Blotting (WB)
216
209
38
25
22
17
11
9
8
6
5
4
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
Supplier
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Immunogen Recombinant Human Resistin produced from E.Coli
Specificity This antibody reacts to Resistin.
Purification Immunoaffinity chromatography
Alternative Name Resistin (RETN Antibody Abstract)
Background Resistin, a product of the RSTN gene, is a peptide hormone belonging to the class of cysteine-rich secreted proteins which is termed the RELM family, and is also described as ADSF (Adipose Tissue-Specific Secretory Factor) and FIZZ3 (Found in Inflammatory Zone). Human resistin contains 108 amino acids as a prepeptide, and its hydrofobic signal peptide is cleaved before its secretion. Resistin circulates in human blood as a dimeric protein consisting of two 92 amino acid polypeptides, which are disulfide-linked via Cys26. Resistin may be an important link between obesity and insulin resistance. Mouse resistin, specifically produced and secreted by adipocyte, acts on skeletal muscle myocytes, hepatocytes and adipocytes themselves so that it reduces their sensitivity to insulin. Steppan et al. have suggested that resistin suppresses the ability of insulin to stimulace glucose uptake. They have also suggested that resistin is present at elevated levels in blood of obese mice, and is down regulated by fasting and antidiabetic drugs. Way et al., on the other hand, have found that resistin expression is severly suppressed in obesity and is stimulated by several antidiabetic drugs. Other studies have shown that mouse resistin increases during the differentiation of adipocytes, but it also seems to inhibit adipogenesis. In contrast, the human adipogenic differentiation is likely to be associated with a down regulation of resistin gene expression. Recent studies have shown that human resistin is expressed also in macrophages and may be a novel link between inflammation and insulin resistance.Synonyms: ADSF, Adipose tissue-specific secretory factor, C/EBP-epsilon-regulated myeloid-specific secreted cysteine-rich protein, Cysteine-rich secreted protein A12-alpha-like 2, Cysteine-rich secreted protein FIZZ3, FIZZ3, HXCP1, RETN, RSTN
Gene ID 56729
NCBI Accession NP_001180303
UniProt Q9HD89
Research Area Cardiovascular, Atherosclerosis, Metabolism, Hormones
Pathways
Application Notes ELISA. Western Blot.
Other applications not tested.
Optimal dilutions are dependent on conditions and should be determined by the user.
Restrictions For Research Use only
Reconstitution Restore with 0.1 mL of deionized water
Concentration 1.0 mg/mL
Buffer 0.05 M phosphate buffer, 0.1 M NaCl, pH 7.2. AZIDE FREE
Preservative Azide free
Handling Advice Avoid repeated freezing and thawing.
Storage -20 °C
Storage Comment Prior to reconstitution store at -70 °C. Following reconstitution store the antibody (in aliquots) at -20 °C for 6 months.
Expiry Date 6 months
Background publications Senolt, Housa, Vernerová et al.: "Resistin in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue, synovial fluid and serum." in: Annals of the rheumatic diseases, Vol. 66, Issue 4, pp. 458-63, 2007 (PubMed).

Pravenec, Kazdová, Cahová et al.: "Fat-specific transgenic expression of resistin in the spontaneously hypertensive rat impairs fatty acid re-esterification." in: International journal of obesity (2005), Vol. 30, Issue 7, pp. 1157-9, 2006 (PubMed).

Way, Görgün, Tong et al.: "Adipose tissue resistin expression is severely suppressed in obesity and stimulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists." in: The Journal of biological chemistry, Vol. 276, Issue 28, pp. 25651-3, 2001 (PubMed).

Banerjee, Lazar: "Dimerization of resistin and resistin-like molecules is determined by a single cysteine." in: The Journal of biological chemistry, Vol. 276, Issue 28, pp. 25970-3, 2001 (PubMed).

Steppan, Brown, Wright et al.: "A family of tissue-specific resistin-like molecules." in: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 98, Issue 2, pp. 502-6, 2001 (PubMed).