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Heat Shock Protein 90 alpha/beta (HSP90 alpha/beta) (AA 291-304) antibody

Details for Product No. ABIN361716, Supplier: Log in to see
Antigen
Epitope
AA 291-304
33
3
Reactivity
Human, Mouse (Murine), Rat (Rattus), Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)
43
25
19
17
17
3
3
1
1
1
Host
Mouse
43
1
Clonality (Clone)
Monoclonal ()
Conjugate
Un-conjugated
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
Application
Immunocytochemistry (ICC), Immunofluorescence (IF), Immunohistochemistry (IHC), ELISA, Western Blotting (WB)
42
35
35
18
18
3
1
Supplier
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Immunogen Recombinant human HSP90alpha, Specificity mapped to amino acids 291-304
Clone Hyb-K41220A
Specificity Detects 90 kDa. Will detect both alpha and beta forms.
Sensitivity 1 µg/ml was sufficient for detection of Hsp90alphabeta in 20 µg of heat shocked HeLa cell lysate by colorimetric immunoblot analysis using Goat Anti-Mouse IgG:HRP as the secondary.
Purification Protein G Purified
Background HSP90 is an abundantly and ubiquitously expressed heat shock protein. It is understood to exist in two principal forms α and β, which share 85 % sequence amino acid homology. The two isoforms of HSP90 are expressed in the cytosolic compartment (1). Despite the similarities, HSP90α exists predominantly as a homodimer while HSP90β exists mainly as a monomer.(2) From a functional perspective, HSP90 participates in the folding, assembly, maturation, and stabilization of specific proteins as an integral component of a chaperone complex. (3-6) Furthermore, HSP90 is highly conserved between species, having 60 % and 78 % amino acid similarity between mammalian and the corresponding yeast and Drosophila proteins, respectively. HSP90 is a highly conserved and essential stress protein that is expressed in all eukaryotic cells. Despite its label of being a heat-shock protein, HSP90 is one of the most highly expressed proteins in unstressed cells (1-2 % of cytosolic protein). It carries out a number of housekeeping functions - including controlling the activity, turnover, and trafficking of a variety of proteins. Most of the HSP90-regulated proteins that have been discovered to date are involved in cell signaling (7-8). The number of proteins now know to interact with HSP90 is about 100. Target proteins include the kinases v-Src, Wee1, and c-Raf, transcriptional regulators such as p53 and steroid receptors, and the polymerases of the hepatitis B virus and telomerase.5 When bound to ATP, HSP90 interacts with co-chaperones Cdc37, p23, and an assortment of immunophilin-like proteins, forming a complex that stabilizes and protects target proteins from proteasomal degradation. In most cases, HSP90-interacting proteins have been shown to co-precipitate with HSP90 when carrying out immunoadsorption studies, and to exist in cytosolic heterocomplexes with it. In a number of cases, variations in HSP90 expression or HSP90 mutation has been shown to degrade signaling function via the protein or to impair a specific function of the protein (such as steroid binding, kinase activity) in vivo. Ansamycin antibiotics, such as geldanamycin and radicicol, inhibit HSP90 function (9).
Cellular Localization: Cytoplasm | Melanosome
Gene ID 3326, 3320
NCBI Accession NP_031381, NP_001017963
UniProt P08238, P07900
Research Area Heat Shock Proteins
Application Notes Recommended Dilution: WB (1:1000), ICC/IF (1:100)
Optimal dilutions for assays should be determined by the user.
Restrictions For Research Use only
Format Liquid
Concentration 1 mg/mL
Buffer PBS pH 7.2, 50 % glycerol, 0.09 % sodium azide
Preservative Sodium azide
Precaution of Use This product contains Sodium azide: a POISONOUS AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE which should be handled by trained staff only.
Storage -20 °C
Supplier Images
 image for anti-Heat Shock Protein 90 alpha/beta (HSP90 alpha/beta) (AA 291-304) antibody (ABIN361716) Hsp90 (K41220A), CellLine copy.
Product cited in: Horvat, Armstrong, Lee et al.: "A mutation in the catalytic loop of Hsp90 specifically impairs ATPase stimulation by Aha1p, but not Hch1p." in: Journal of molecular biology, Vol. 426, Issue 12, pp. 2379-92, 2014 (PubMed).

Stasyk, Holzmann, Stumberger et al.: "Proteomic analysis of endosomes from genetically modified p14/MP1 mouse embryonic fibroblasts." in: Proteomics, Vol. 10, Issue 22, pp. 4117-27, 2010 (PubMed).

Background publications Kishimoto, Fukuma, Mizuno et al.: "Identification of the pentapeptide constituting a dominant epitope common to all eukaryotic heat shock protein 90 molecular chaperones." in: Cell stress & chaperones, Vol. 10, Issue 4, pp. 296-311, 2005 (PubMed).

Arlander, Eapen, Vroman et al.: "Hsp90 inhibition depletes Chk1 and sensitizes tumor cells to replication stress." in: The Journal of biological chemistry, Vol. 278, Issue 52, pp. 52572-7, 2003 (PubMed).

Pratt, Toft: "Regulation of signaling protein function and trafficking by the hsp90/hsp70-based chaperone machinery." in: Experimental biology and medicine (Maywood, N.J.), Vol. 228, Issue 2, pp. 111-33, 2003 (PubMed).

Neckers: "Hsp90 inhibitors as novel cancer chemotherapeutic agents." in: Trends in molecular medicine, Vol. 8, Issue 4 Suppl, pp. S55-61, 2002 (PubMed).

Pearl, Prodromou: "Structure, function, and mechanism of the Hsp90 molecular chaperone." in: Advances in protein chemistry, Vol. 59, pp. 157-86, 2002 (PubMed).

Pratt: "The hsp90-based chaperone system: involvement in signal transduction from a variety of hormone and growth factor receptors." in: Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N.Y.), Vol. 217, Issue 4, pp. 420-34, 1998 (PubMed).

Nemoto, Sato, Iwanari et al.: "Domain structures and immunogenic regions of the 90-kDa heat-shock protein (HSP90). Probing with a library of anti-HSP90 monoclonal antibodies and limited proteolysis." in: The Journal of biological chemistry, Vol. 272, Issue 42, pp. 26179-87, 1997 (PubMed).

Pratt, Toft: "Steroid receptor interactions with heat shock protein and immunophilin chaperones." in: Endocrine reviews, Vol. 18, Issue 3, pp. 306-60, 1997 (PubMed).

Lowe: "Colipase stabilizes the lid domain of pancreatic triglyceride lipase." in: The Journal of biological chemistry, Vol. 272, Issue 1, pp. 9-12, 1997 (PubMed).

Whitesell, Mimnaugh, De Costa et al.: "Inhibition of heat shock protein HSP90-pp60v-src heteroprotein complex formation by benzoquinone ansamycins: essential role for stress proteins in oncogenic transformation." in: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 91, Issue 18, pp. 8324-8, 1994 (PubMed).

Minami, Kawasaki, Miyata et al.: "Analysis of native forms and isoform compositions of the mouse 90-kDa heat shock protein, HSP90." in: The Journal of biological chemistry, Vol. 266, Issue 16, pp. 10099-103, 1991 (PubMed).