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Extracellular Matrix

The Extracellular Matrix (ECM) is a complex network of proteins, sugars, and other molecules that surround and support cells in our body. It acts as a scaffolding structure, providing mechanical support and influencing cellular behavior. The ECM is involved in various biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and tissue development. antibodies-online is able to support your ECM research. We offer high-quality antibodies against key targets in ECM environment. Discover below.

Biological Role of ECM

The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays diverse roles and is a crucial component of the cellular microenvironment. It is a highly dynamic structure that undergoes constant remodeling, involving the deposition, degradation, and modification of ECM components. ECM remodeling is vital for tissue architecture reorganization. It serves as a regulatory mechanism for cell differentiation, influencing processes like stem cell niche formation, branching morphogenesis, angiogenesis, bone remodeling, and wound healing. On the other hand, abnormal ECM dynamics disrupt cell proliferation and invasion, impair cell death, and hinder cell differentiation, leading to congenital defects and diseases such as tissue fibrosis and cancer. To develop new therapeutic approaches for diseases and innovative strategies for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms and regulation of ECM remodeling.

Mechanisms of ECM function - antibodies-online.com

Structure of ECM

The versatile functions of the ECM depend on its diverse physical, biochemical, and biomechanical properties. Anchorage to the basement membrane is essential for various biological processes, including asymmetric cell division in stem cell biology and maintenance of tissue polarity (stage 1). Depending on contexts, the ECM may serve to block or facilitate cell migration (stages 2 and 3). In addition, by binding to growth factor signaling molecules and preventing their otherwise free diffusion, the ECM acts as a sink for these signals and helps shape a concentration gradient (stage 4). Certain ECM components, including heparan sulfate proteoglycans and the hyaluronic acid receptor CD44, can selectively bind to different growth factors and function as a signal coreceptor (stage 5) or a presenter (stage 6) and help determine the direction of cell–cell communication (Lu et al., 2011). The ECM also direct signals to the cell by using its endogenous growth factor domains (not depicted) or functional fragment derivatives after being processed by proteases such as MMPs (stage 7). Finally, cells directly sense the biomechanical properties of the ECM, including its stiffness, and change a wide variety of behaviors accordingly (stage 8).

Importance of ECM in Research

The ECM plays a crucial role in understanding the functioning of cells and tissues. It provides the necessary environment for cellular communication, regulates cell behavior, and influences the response to disease and injury. By studying the ECM, researchers can gain insights into tissue architecture, cellular interactions, and disease mechanisms. Understanding the ECM is essential for advancing fields such as regenerative medicine, cancer research, and tissue engineering. antibodies-online is able to support your ECM research. We offer high-quality antibodies against key targets in ECM environment. Discover below.

ECM Remodeler: Collagen Synthesis & Degradation

Collagen is a major component of the ECM and is responsible for providing structural integrity and strength to tissues. ECM remodelers are enzymes that regulate the synthesis and degradation of collagen. These processes are essential for maintaining the balance and integrity of the ECM. Dysregulation of collagen synthesis or degradation can contribute to various diseases, such as fibrosis and arthritis. Studying the mechanisms of ECM remodeling can help identify potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Biomarkers against ECM target can provide valuable information about tissue remodeling, disease progression, and treatment response. Detecting and analyzing ECM biomarkers can aid in early disease diagnosis, personalized medicine, and monitoring therapeutic interventions.

Serum Markers of collagen synthesis:

Serum Markers of collagen degradation:

Serum Markers of inhibition of degradation:

Collagen Antibodies

Collagen is the most abundant fibrous protein within the interstitial ECM and constitutes up to 30% of the total protein mass of a multicellular animal.

Type 1 Collagen Antibodies

Product
Reactivity
Clonality
Application
Cat. No.
Quantity
Datasheet
Reactivity Cow, Human, Mammalian, Mouse, Rat
Clonality Polyclonal
Application WB, ELISA, IHC, IP
Cat. No. ABIN5596819
Quantity 100 μg
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Cow, Human, Mammalian, Mouse, Rat
Clonality Polyclonal
Application WB, ELISA, IHC, IP
Cat. No. ABIN5596823
Quantity 50 μg
Datasheet Datasheet

Type 2 Collagen Antibodies

Product
Reactivity
Clonality
Application
Cat. No.
Quantity
Datasheet
Reactivity Cow, Human, Mammalian, Mouse, Rat, Sheep
Clonality Polyclonal
Application WB, ELISA, IHC, IP
Cat. No. ABIN5596824
Quantity 100 μg
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Human
Clonality Polyclonal
Application ELISA
Cat. No. ABIN135048
Quantity 0.2 mg
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Human, Mouse, Rat
Clonality Polyclonal
Application WB, ELISA, IHC, IF
Cat. No. ABIN1533237
Quantity 100 μg
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Cow, Human, Mammalian
Clonality Polyclonal
Application WB, ELISA, IHC, IP
Cat. No. ABIN5596826
Quantity 100 μg
Datasheet Datasheet

Type 3 Collagen Antibodies

Product
Reactivity
Clonality
Application
Cat. No.
Quantity
Datasheet
Reactivity Human
Clonality Monoclonal
Application WB, IF, IP
Cat. No. ABIN7266459
Quantity 100 μL
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Human
Clonality Polyclonal
Application ELISA
Cat. No. ABIN135050
Quantity 0.2 mg
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Human, Mouse, Rat
Clonality Polyclonal
Application ELISA, IHC, IF
Cat. No. ABIN1533238
Quantity 100 μg
Datasheet Datasheet

Type 4 Collagen Antibodies

Product
Reactivity
Clonality
Application
Cat. No.
Quantity
Datasheet
Reactivity Cow, Human, Mammalian
Clonality Polyclonal
Application ELISA, WB, IHC, IP
Cat. No. ABIN5596835
Quantity 100 μg
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Human, Mouse, Pig, Rat
Clonality Polyclonal
Application ELISA, WB, IHC (p), IHC (fro), FACS, IF (p), IF (cc)
Cat. No. ABIN707396
Quantity 100 μL
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Human, Mouse, Rat
Clonality Monoclonal
Application IHC (p), IF
Cat. No. ABIN7212370
Quantity 100 μL
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Human
Clonality Polyclonal
Application ELISA
Cat. No. ABIN135052
Quantity 0.2 mg
Datasheet Datasheet

Type 5 Collagen Antibodies

Product
Reactivity
Clonality
Application
Cat. No.
Quantity
Datasheet
Reactivity Mouse, Rat
Clonality Polyclonal
Application WB, IHC, IF
Cat. No. ABIN7073547
Quantity 100 μL
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Cow, Human, Mammalian
Clonality Polyclonal
Application ELISA, WB, IHC, IP
Cat. No. ABIN5596841
Quantity 100 μg
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Human
Clonality Polyclonal
Application ELISA
Cat. No. ABIN135054
Quantity 0.2 mg
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Cow, Human, Mammalian
Clonality Polyclonal
Application ELISA, WB, IHC, IP
Cat. No. ABIN5596843
Quantity 50 μg
Datasheet Datasheet

Type 6 Collagen Antibodies

Product
Reactivity
Clonality
Application
Cat. No.
Quantity
Datasheet
Reactivity Cow, Human
Clonality Polyclonal
Application WB, ELISA, IHC, IP, IHC (p), IF
Cat. No. ABIN214581
Quantity 50 μg
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Cow, Human, Mammalian
Clonality Polyclonal
Application WB, ELISA, IHC, IP
Cat. No. ABIN5596844
Quantity 100 μg
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Human
Clonality Polyclonal
Application ELISA
Cat. No. ABIN135056
Quantity 0.2 mg
Datasheet Datasheet
Reactivity Human
Clonality Polyclonal
Application ELISA, IHC, IHC (p), IHC (fro), ICC, DB
Cat. No. ABIN462457
Quantity 50 μg
Datasheet Datasheet

ECM Remodeler Antibodies

Core Matrisome of ECM

With the completion of genome sequencing for various organisms, we now have a fairly comprehensive understanding of the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein composition. In mammals, this collection of proteins, known as the "core matrisome," consists of approximately 300 proteins. Additionally, there are numerous enzymes that modify the ECM, growth factors that bind to the ECM, and other proteins associated with the ECM. These different types of ECM and ECM-associated proteins work together to assemble and modify extracellular matrices, as well as bind to cells through ECM receptors. Alongside receptors for growth factors bound to the ECM, these proteins provide multiple signals to cells, influencing their survival, proliferation, differentiation, shape, polarity, and movement. The evolution of ECM proteins played a vital role in the development of multicellularity, the organization of cells into tissue layers, and the emergence of new structures during vertebrate evolution. The importance of the ECM is evident in the diversity of ECM proteins, as well as their modular domain structures, which enable multiple interactions and the evolution of novel protein architectures.


References

  1. Hubmacher, Apte: "The biology of the extracellular matrix: novel insights." in: Current opinion in rheumatology, Vol. 25, Issue 1, pp. 65-70, (2013) (PubMed).
  2. Sottile, Hocking: "Fibronectin polymerization regulates the composition and stability of extracellular matrix fibrils and cell-matrix adhesions." in: Molecular biology of the cell, Vol. 13, Issue 10, pp. 3546-59, (2002) (PubMed).
  3. Daley, Peters, Larsen: "Extracellular matrix dynamics in development and regenerative medicine." in: Journal of cell science, Vol. 121, Issue Pt 3, pp. 255-64, (2008) (PubMed).
  4. Hynes, Naba: "Overview of the matrisome--an inventory of extracellular matrix constituents and functions." in: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in biology, Vol. 4, Issue 1, pp. a004903, (2012) (PubMed).
  5. Taipale, Keski-Oja: "Growth factors in the extracellular matrix." in: FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, Vol. 11, Issue 1, pp. 51-9, (1997) (PubMed).
  6. López, González, Díez: "Circulating biomarkers of collagen metabolism in cardiac diseases." in: Circulation, Vol. 121, Issue 14, pp. 1645-54, (2010) (PubMed).
  7. Lu, Weaver, Werb: "The extracellular matrix: a dynamic niche in cancer progression." in: The Journal of cell biology, Vol. 196, Issue 4, pp. 395-406, (2012) (PubMed).
  8. Lu, Takai, Weaver, Werb: "Extracellular matrix degradation and remodeling in development and disease." in: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in biology, Vol. 3, Issue 12, (2012) (PubMed).
  9. Hamill, Kligys, Hopkinson, Jones: "Laminin deposition in the extracellular matrix: a complex picture emerges." in: Journal of cell science, Vol. 122, Issue Pt 24, pp. 4409-17, (2010) (PubMed).
  10. Singh, Carraher, Schwarzbauer: "Assembly of fibronectin extracellular matrix." in: Annual review of cell and developmental biology, Vol. 26, pp. 397-419, (2010) (PubMed).
  11. Frantz, Stewart, Weaver: "The extracellular matrix at a glance." in: Journal of cell science, Vol. 123, Issue Pt 24, pp. 4195-200, (2011) (PubMed).
Rene von der Forst
Rene von der Forst, MSE
Marketing and E-Commerce Manager

Master of Science in engineering. 12+ years of experience in marketing and e-commerce in the life science sector.

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